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The recent discovery of a new butterfly species on Niue has sparked excitement amongst the people of Niue and butterfly enthusiasts around the world!

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Rating: 3.7/5

The recently discovered Niue Blue is the only endemic butterfly species found on the remote Pacific island of Niue. This special butterfly was found on the island in 2009 by Australian Museum Research Associate Rob Lachlan.

(read more)

published October 20th, 2013

Aland’s latest issue features ‘The European Peacock butterfly’!

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Rating: 4.0/5

In August, all smartphone or tablet PC users can join the European Peacock butterfly for an enticing visit to several tourist attractions in Åland. August is when Åland Post presents a thrilling piece of stamp news!

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published August 25th, 2013

These delicate creatures are the subject of Tokelau’s latest stamp issue!!

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Rating: 4.3/5

The remote atolls of Tokelau have a small but colourful butterfly fauna of three species. These delicate creatures are the subject of Tokelau’s latest stamp issue: Tokelau Butterflies.

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published July 27th, 2013

Royal Mail issues a stamp issue devoted to Butterflies!!

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Rating: 4.3/5

butterflies are a classic topic popular with collectors and the public alike. The butterflies issue, celebrating the british love of butterflies, is an exceptional set of 10 stamps that continues the momentum gained from the Action for Species series.

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published June 27th, 2013

Spicebush Swallowtail (Butterfly) by United States Post

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Rating: 3.9/5

In 2013, the U.S. Postal Service features the Spicebush Swallowtail on its third butterfly stamp for use on large greeting card envelopes and other mail of non-standard shapes and sizes.

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published February 20th, 2013

Jersey’s Butterflies & Moths III Stamp issue

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Rating: 3.5/5

Butterflies and moths are well studied in Jersey, the first records having been made over 150 years ago. Global climate change is thought to be the cause of a remarkable number of French and southernEuropean species spreading north and being recorded in the Channel Islands and the UK. Some are vagrants in ones and twos but others have become established here during the past decade or so creating an exciting new opportunity for lepidopterists in Jersey studying these beautiful insects.

Broad-bordered Yellow Underwing Noctua fimbriata

A rather prosaic name contrasts with the dramatic black and orange colouring of this large nocturnal moth. It is common in high summer but is not often seen during the day, although it might be inadvertently disturbed in a sheltered position where it will be aestivating – the summer equivalent of hibernating.

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published May 13th, 2012

Baltimore Checkerspot Butterfly Flutters On U.S. Postal Stamp

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Rating: 3.6/5

The stamp is good for mailing large greeting cards and other non-standard shaped and sized mail, and for mailing First-Class Mail letters weighing up to 2 ounces.

“This beautiful stamp will be coveted by anyone having an interest in butterflies, both in Maryland and across the nation,” said U.S. Postal Service Stamp Services Manager Stephen Kearney. “As a customer convenience, many large greeting cards requiring the additional postage will feature a silhouette of a butterfly to suggest using the stamp.” (read more)

published January 28th, 2012

Monaco’s 25th Telethon stamp issue

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Rating: 4.0/5

The “25th Telethon” will take place on 2nd and 3rd December 2011. As many European countries, the Principality of Monaco supports this event organised in Monaco by the Association de Promotion et d’Organisation du Téléthon Monaco (OTM). During “MonacoPhil 2011”, the “Office des Emissions de Timbres-Poste” will sell illustrated, numbered envelopes bearing the “Telethon” stamp. Proceeds will go to the OTM.

Technical Details:

Layout: Creaphil

Printing process : Offset

Size of the stamp : 41 x 30 mm horizontal

published November 22nd, 2011

Liechtenstein Butterflies III stamp issue

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Rating: 5.0/5

For the third time following 2009 and 2010 butterflies native to Liechtenstein feature centrally on a definitive stamp. The “Butterflies – III” issue, again designed by Stefan Erne, depicts two more harbingers of spring, the Orange Tip and the Peacock.  (read more)

published September 7th, 2011

The Birdwing Butterflies Issue by Papuea New Guinea

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Rating: 4.8/5

Birdwing butterflies are the largest of all butterflies. Birdwings are typified by large size (up to a maximum body length of 7.6 cm or 3 inches and a wingspan of 28 cm or 11 inches in O. alexandrae), showy coloration (in contrasting shades of green, yellow, black, white, and sometimes blue or orange), and slender, lanceolate forewings.

The male Birdwing is brightly coloured with green, gold and black, and is smaller than the female. The larger female Birdwing is black and white, with yellow markings on the hindwings. She has a wingspan of up to 20 cm.

With few exceptions (i.e., the New Guinean O. meridionalis and O. paradisea), the hindwings lack tails. Sexual dimorphism is strong in Ornithoptera species only, where males are black combined with bright iridescent green, blue, orange or yellow while the larger and less colourful females are overall black or dark brownish with white, pale brown or yellow markings. (read more)

published August 24th, 2011

Fauna of Hungary

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Rating: 4.8/5

In keeping with its traditions, Magyar Posta presents the characteristic fauna of Hungary each year on a stamp block and set of stamps. The new 2011 stamps depict butterflies and moths.

Insects with scale-covered wings (Lepidoptera) in-clude moths and butterflies, which are thought to be the last order to have evolved among arthropods. To date about 150,000 species of moths have been identified, and 3,500 are known to have occurred in the Carpathian Basin. Insects belonging to the Lepi-doptera order are commonly described in Hungarian by a number of words, which can be summarised in English as moth and butterfly. Most of the species representing 40 moth families living in Hungary are small and fragile, but there are some which are large and fat, and they usually fly at night. The ones that are nocturnal are called moths in everyday speech. The word butterfly is mainly used for the splendid dainty species with beautiful coloration, which are on the wing during the day. All butterflies belong to one family only, which is represented by 4 species in Hungary. These, compared to their wonderful rela-tives living in the tropics, are elegant but modest in appearance. (Source: written by the expert Zsolt Bálint)

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published June 1st, 2011